How To Lace Vans Sneakers (The Proper Method)

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If you've ever had an unfortunate look at your new Sk8-His, with a set of laces in one hand while scratching your head with the other, confusion , this is for you.

Okay, in reality this is probably not a situation you have ever had to deal with, because when it comes to lacing up our favorite shoes, 90 percent of us (no official statistics) just leave them that way as we found it when we first took it out of the box. However, a little more care and thought about how to tie them up can help take your shoe game to the next level.

If you want to keep your creps fresh, you should make it a habit to put your shoelaces in the washing machine every now and then. Especially if they are white. The dirt that accumulates on laces can draw your gaze down, even if you were liberal with suede protection.

How to Lace Up Popular Vans Sneakers

Vans has literally made thousands of variations over the past 50 years, and although some of them haven't been around for long, there are four major lace models that have really stood the test of time. Some of them are probably the best sneakers ever. Follow these steps to lace everyone – and keep in mind that there are certain lacing methods that work better for some models than others.

Vans Authentic

The Vans Authentic was the first shoe that was produced Produced and sold by the legendary skate brand in 1966. Only 12 pairs were sold on the first day, but today is It is one of the most popular trainers in the world, and for good reason – it is a style classic that can be made chic or down with ease.

The Authentic has a simple canvas construction with a low profile and a characteristic waffle profile sole. In addition, there are only five eyelets on each side that are fairly close together, which means that only short laces are required here. The lacing system is also closed at the bottom like an Oxford shoe, which means you get a clean, tight fit when tied together.

Depending on the model, use a flat tip in black or white color of the shoe and thread it through so that it criss-crosses above and below the eyelets, where you then form a neat bow can tie together.

The steps

  • Pass both ends of the laces down through the lower two holes and leave the left and right laces equally long.
  • Look at the shoe and stick the left shoelace through the next hole on the right side. It should go over the tongue now.
  • Mirror what you just did, but with the other side, thread the right tip through the top of the next hole on the left.
  • Perform the lacing side by side in this manner, making sure that you insert each cord into the top of each hole. Mirror this process with your other shoe so that they are similar.

 Vans Authentic

Vans Era

The model was developed by the Legendary skateboard pioneers Tony Alva and Stacey Peralta designed and is basically a cushioned update of the Authentic, but with subtle design changes.

The model retains the same canvas finish and a very similar silhouette, but padded collar and jazz color combinations also make it the shoe of choice for a new generation of skaters in the late 1970s.

Due to its similarity to the Authentic, the Vans Era should be laced in the same way. Although the typical color combinations give you a little more leeway to get creative with your laces.

The Steps

  • Guide both tip ends down through the lower two holes. left and right shoelaces of equal length.
  • Look at the shoe and insert the left cord at the top through the next hole on the right. It should go over the tongue now.
  • Mirror what you just did, but with the other side, thread the right tip through the top of the next hole on the left.
  • Perform the lacing side by side in this manner, making sure that you insert each cord into the top of each hole. Mirror this process with your other shoe so that they are similar.

 Vans Era

 Vans Era

Old Skool

The Old Skool is that first chunky trainer with the now well-known Vans hard shoulder. It is similar in form to the Era, but has an additional cladding that increases the durability when shredding on a board.

With a mix of suede and canvas construction and reinforced stitching in the most stressed areas, the Vans Old Skool was the most durable skate shoe of its time. It also has a few more eyelets than its predecessors, which means you need a longer length of laces. Nowadays it is an undisputed classic silhouette that is insensitive to the ups and downs of sneaker trends.

Either cross lacing as in the above models or lacing with straight bars are the best ways to tie things together. In the latter, thread the tip through the lower eyelets and work in an S-shaped pattern. Leave clear, horizontal lines at the top and make sure that no other material remains hidden under the tip guards. This is a more complicated technique than cross-lacing, but it results in a cleaner, minimalist look that complements the silhouette of the Old Skool.

The steps

  • Pass both tip ends downwards. The two lower holes leave the left and right laces equally long.
  • When you look down at the shoe, run the left lacing up and through the next right hole with the end facing the ceiling.
  • Now put the right lacing through the third eyelet on the left and skip the second one. There should now be an empty hole on the left.
  • Take the right cord and cross it by sticking it down through the empty eyelet on the left. This should create another straight bar that reflects the first one.
  • Do exactly the same with the left cord and cross it by sticking it down through the empty eyelet opposite. You should now have three bars.
  • Continue lacing this way and cross the shoelaces on the opposite side to get new bars until you reach the top.

 Vans Old Skool

 Vans Old Skool

Sk8-Hi

The very first High-top skate shoe that Vans Sk8-Hi brought with it A completely new look for the park when it was first introduced in 1978. But it wasn't just about aesthetics – this revolutionary new shoe offered skaters more comfort, ankle support and protected their ankles from rogue boards.

With its high-top design and eight eyelets on each side, the Vans Sk8-Hi needs a long tip to get up. You need something longer than a shoelace.

In terms of color and style, flat laces look best with this particular model, and white goes with almost every other shoe color black. Because of the height of this model, the bar lacing works best because it gives a simpler, retracted finish. The cross lacing is a bit fussy in this case.

Steps

  • Pass both ends of the shoelaces down through the two lower holes and leave the left and right shoelaces the same length.
  • Look at the shoe, run the left shoelace up and through the next right hole with the end facing the ceiling.
  • Now pass the right lacing through the third eyelet on the left and skip the second. There should now be an empty hole on the left.
  • Take the right cord and cross it by sticking it down through the empty eyelet on the left. This should create another straight bar that reflects the first one.
  • Do exactly the same with the left cord and cross it by sticking it down through the empty eyelet opposite. You should now have three bars.
  • Continue lacing this way and cross the shoelaces on the opposite side to get new bars until you reach the top.

 Vans Sk8-Hi

 Vans Sk8-Hi

The History of Vans

Now a staple on the streets of Britain and beyond van was firs … Oh wait, wrong type of vans.

The confusion stems from the fact that Vans (with a capital letter & # 39; V & # 39;) is also a historical and very popular brand for American skate shoes.

It all started in 1966 when the brothers Paul Van Doren and Jim Van Doren, together with their partners Gordon Lee and Serge Delia, opened a shop in Anaheim, California, where they made rubber soled deck shoes for blatant types on the west coast and sold.

As news of an empty California Swi spread As these new shoes and their sticky waffle profiles were used more and more for cruising boccias, more and more skaters climbed into the Van Doren brothers' small shop to get a couple to snap.

Fast Forward Vans had 70 stores in California by the late 1970s and was already beginning to sell internationally. Demand has never stopped, and today the Vans brand is well known, especially with the skate style that has seen a renaissance in recent years.

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